Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden (1982)

Warnings: 

  • Homophobia: Written in the late 70’s, this book contains an expected level of homophobia from peers and teachers in a private, religious school system; there are allies in the novel seen in a few teachers, outside forces who influence the school, and in the protagonists family; an older couple faces employment discrimination and are fired for their relationship and described by other characters as “wrong” for that relationship
  • Sexual Content: very mild, non-explicitly detailed off screen scene that is referenced a few times after the fact in a negative light by characters trying to prove the protagonist is gay
  • Alcohol and Drugs: very few scenes of underage characters drinking alcohol in a relatively responsible manner; no mention of drug usage by any persons

Review:

Annie on My Mind is a story of young love in an unwelcoming society, often described as a landmark for LGBTQ literature. The protagonist, Liza, meets a girl in a museum and feels an instant connection to her. They spend more time together, eventually developing a relationship, all while Liza is attempting to keep her image clean as the student body president. The school is facing a tough time financially, and as one of the fundraising campaign leaders, she is implored to represent her school in the best possible light.

Because this novel was written and set in the late 1970’s/early 80’s, Liza does face some discrimination for her sexuality once she is found out. Despite this, the book ends with a happy ending, one of the first of its kind to do so.

I had the fortunate luck to receive a copy including an interview with the author, Nancy Garden. In this interview, she discusses the climate at the time she wrote the novel and the reception to it after it was released. The book is in the top 50 of the Top 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books, since a lot of schools took issue with the same-sex relationship within it. I think the interview may have been my favorite part of the book, and I would urge any young queer people who want a firsthand account of growing up gay in the 50’s and onwards to look for it.

Overall, I think this book is a must-read for young LGBTQ individuals who want to connect more with their community history, or don’t know much about it at all. Despite the homophobia, it’s a relatively light and easy read with plenty of wholesome moments and love to combat the less accepting characters in the novel.

My favorite part of the novel was the (somewhat reluctant) acceptance of Liza’s sexuality by her family. Although her parents are hesitant and afraid of the societal backlash she may receive, they both stand up for Liza and offer her their unconditional love and support. Her younger brother, even more abundantly so, is the first person Liza comes out to outside of her girlfriend. He takes it with grace and is the first person to show her real support, in a string of heartwarming moments that give her the confidence necessary to begin to accept herself.

While I did love the book, and especially the impact it had historically as one of the first to show a lesbian relationship that did not end in tragedy or a heterosexual romance, from a solely literary standpoint, it was pretty average. The writing didn’t stand out much, and it traded a full plot for a syrupy sweet romance-focused novel that didn’t really go anywhere. I would have liked to see more of Liza’s character outside of her relationship with Annie and her struggle with being gay. Still, though, it was a sweet book, so I’d recommend.

Sincerely yours,

Nyla Linn (She/Her)

Rating: ★★★★ (4 stars)

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Author: Nyla Linn

Queer reader, editor, and blogger with a passion for good representation. Follow my blog for book recommendations, thoughtful discussions on how LGBTQ+ individuals are treated in the media, and reviews on your favorite novels. My door is always open for my dear readers.

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